Archive for the ‘Ladies’ Class’ category

Enmore Church of Christ

February 24, 2020

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Our venue today for this year’s World Evangelism & Media Workshop was with the Enmore (Guyana, South America) Church of Christ; these brethren were gracious enough to host again in 2020. Many congregations were represented, some of which traveling far to be present. The auditorium was full. Martha Rushmore spoke to the sisters in Christ, while Frederick Darrel, Nigel Milo and I (Louis Rushmore) spoke to brothers and sisters or for one session to the men present.

A large contingent of members from the Amelia’s Ward Church of Christ in Linden were present—three vans full. Burnham Drive and Blueberry Hill churches of Christ from Linden were represented, too.

I have difficulty understanding Guyanese Creole, but I presumed that since we’re all supposed to be speaking English, Guyanese brethren could understand me better than I understand them when they converse with each other. Today, a sister in Christ informed me that this is the first year over the years I have been going to Guyana that she understood my English. She wasn’t sure whether I was speaking more clearly or if she had become accustomed to my speech.

It appears that all in attendance were please to be there and were edified. I know I was happy to be present, and I was edified also. After a long day, traveling to the venue, returning to Linden and approximately six hours of program, we were all tired. A stop at the mall along the way home was a welcome interlude.

Richmond over the Essequibo

February 16, 2020

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Saturday, February 15 found the World Evangelism & Media Team conducting a workshop in the meetinghouse of the Richmond Church of Christ across the Essequibo River in Guyana, South America. Several congregations were represented, and we also had visitors from the Flatwoods Church of Christ in Kentucky, USA. Members of one of the local congregations attending traveled 65 miles by boat before continuing their journey on land so they could be a part of the workshop. The church building overflowed into the outside front of the structure. We trust that we glorified God and contributed to the edification of all who were present. We know that we were encouraged and built up.

The night before, we lodged in a hotel in Parika. Unfortunately, Martha took another tumble (her 9th major fall since we married three years ago). Besides hurting generally and literally from head to toe, she sustained a nasty abrasion on her upper thigh. Few of us got much sleep that night, what little night there was before 3:30 a.m. when we arose and made ready for our departure in the still dark of night.

Beyond appreciating anymore the fast, uncomfortable body-beating water taxis, we traveled as pedestrian passengers aboard a car ferry to make the 20-mile crossing of the Essequibo River to Supernaam. Then, we took a taxi to Richmond, some 30 minutes or so beyond the river port.

This side of the biggest river among big rivers in Guyana, brethren always heartily support our get-togethers for fellowship and study of God’s Word. Many talented, longtime preachers, their families and additional members grace us with their presence each year. Lord willing, we look forward to mingling with these saints next year, too.

2020 Guyana Workshops

February 11, 2020

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Each year for several years, I have been traveling to Guyana, South America once or twice a year to conduct workshops and Gospel meetings across this nation. Guyanese preachers and I together major in edification of our brethren (1 Corinthians 3:6) and minor in evangelism (Mark 16:15-16). Edification is crucial for personal, congregational and brotherhood maturity among foreign nationals for them to participate in a meaningful way in growing the Lord’s church internally and externally among them. In earlier years, my late wife Bonnie accompanied me here and taught ladies and children. Since 2017, my wife Martha and I continue to labor in this ministry together and alongside Guyanese preachers.

The workshop theme this year is, “If Not Now, When?” The corresponding topics address laying the groundwork for and progressing toward the appointment of elders and deacons in the churches throughout the country, encouraging brethren to assume congregational responsibility for their finances, preparing more fully to rely primarily on themselves for their own edification, and analyzing and implementing methods for the churches of Christ throughout Guyana to accept a greater role in evangelizing their own country. Happily, many congregations are already actively working towards these goals, and so far, the lessons have been well received.

Out time here is from January 31 through March 2. We have completed programs in Lethem near the Brazilian border and in Port Kaituma near the border with Venezuela. At the latter location, we had two venues—one in the town and one along the bank of a canal to the Kaituma River. Tomorrow, we leave our base in Linden for two more workshops, like the sites two which we’ve already traveled, distant from each other and in opposite directions.

Wednesday and Thursday, we will lodge in New Amsterdam; Thursday we have a workshop hosted by the Cotton Tree Church of Christ. Friday night, we will lodge at the other end of the coast in Parika. Saturday, we have a workshop scheduled for Richmond across the 20-mile-wide Essequibo River; that evening, we will make the several hours’ drive back to Linden.

In the weeks ahead if our Lord permits, we will have programs near Georgetown the capital, Paramakatoi in the mountains near Brazil, outside Mabaruma near Venezuela and Kildonan once more in the southern coastal area.

This year we minimized the amount of clothes and foodstuffs and maximized the number of Bibles, books and tracts in our luggage. This year, too, I’m taking fewer pictures than in prior years (as well as in the Asian countries to which I go); it’s a matter of been there—saw that before. The more I come here or go to be with brethren in Asia, it is like going home, not to say that I don’t appreciate our home in America. Martha and I solicit your prayers and encourage your participation with us.

We are most fortunate to be coworkers with brother Nigel Milo, his wife Jasmine and son Zab. This year, my additional Guyanese co-speaker is brother Frederick Darrel, preacher for the Kitty Church of Christ in Georgetown. Together, we aim to glorify God, edify brethren and reach lost sous with the Gospel of Christ.

Three Weeks in Myanmar

October 21, 2017

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The first week, Martha and I lodged in the Hotel Bo Bo Min by evening and taught by day some 30 minutes away on the east side of Yangon. Nine Chinese Gospel preachers from the northeastern area of Myitkyina convened for the special series of classes. Some of the ministers have dual Myanmar and Chinese citizenship, and they all speak the tribal language of Lisu.

Martha taught ladies, and I taught the men. My lessons over the week included crash courses on “How We Got the Bible” and “Bible Geography & Sacred History.” In addition, tracts and books in the Lisu language were provided for these attendees.

Weeks two and three, Martha and I lodged by night on the other side of Yangon in the Hotel Corolla, and during the days, we taught Christians and non-Christians who had come from throughout the nation especially for these lessons. I taught the same courses as I did during the previous week, plus English and a variety of short biblical lessons.

Over the three weeks, we worshipped on the Lord’s Day and I spoke for three different congregations in the Yangon area. We were also lunch guests one day in the home of a revered Christian brother and his family in the outskirts of Hmawbi. Not the least of our joys were the playful moments enjoyed with a certain pintsized boy and an equally precious little girl. Both are preschool, but already they have mastered more than I did in first grade—a few decades ago.

An Indian brother who directs a Bible training school in India visited while we were in Myanmar. I have known him for years, and he was the teacher of several of the Burmese evangelists with whom I labor for our Lord. Not a part of what we do, of course, we observed samples of Buddhism everywhere, including young, female monks in training—wearing pink.

Ready to move on in our two months abroad, still, we were reluctant to part from the dear Christian brethren whom we count as among our most cherished friends on earth. I have grown to love them over the past decade, and Martha and they became fast friends. Friday evening, October 20, Martha and I winged our way across a time zone or two to Singapore to be with more Christian friends and brethren. We struggled to reload our suitcases, and we don’t dare buy another thing or accept any gifts; otherwise, we may have to check into getting luggage racks installed atop an airliner or two!

We appreciate and continue to covet prayers on our behalf as we travel overseas. Martha and I, Lord willing, will return to the USA on November 21.

Robert’s Bush

March 4, 2017

96-dpi-4x6-roberts-bush-3Friday, March 3 was spent in earnest labors on the next Rushmore Newsletter, the February edition of Gospel Gazette Online (yes, I’m late) and a forthcoming issue of The Voice of Truth International. I finalized the efforts of Rebecca (back in the States), Martha and me on the Rushmore Newsletter, and I sent it digitally to a printing company in Michigan. Subsequently, I sent our newsletter information over the Internet to over 700 persons, some of whom responded almost immediately with congratulations on our marriage, which took place on New Year’s Day this year.

96-dpi-4x6-roberts-bush-1I also prepared and sent the next color postcard to be printed by the same firm. One side of the card shows Martha and me in a flat-bottomed boat, wearing ponchos in a pouring rain, with the tide out and experiencing difficulty getting to shore; the back of the postcard contains information about our mission work.

96-dpi-4x6-roberts-bush-2Saturday, March 4 marked the final 2017 Annual World Evangelism Guyana Nationwide Workshop for this year. It was hosted by the Robert’s Bush Church of Christ. It assembles about an hour from our base in Linden. That was Martha and my 16th seminar this year and over the past six weeks.

96-dpi-4x6-roberts-bush-4Several congregations were represented. Nigel Milo, Martha and I, as at other locations, taught all those present. Brother Milo and I took turns teaching the combined classes as well as classes for the men. Martha taught the ladies classes.

Though this year’s workshops throughout Guyana have just ended, we are already anticipating next year when we will do it all again, Lord willing. Martha has turned out to be a natural, consistently placing the teaching of the Word of God above what is unfamiliar and challenging to her in the surroundings and backdrop of an overseas destination. I think that brethren we encountered have benefitted from the effort of all three of us. However, we are edified and uplifted as much or more than anyone we have visited in Guyana. In any case, to God be the glory!

Kaituma Mouth

February 17, 2017

Still in Region 1, Wednesday, February 15, Nigel Milo, Kishore Etwaroo, Martha Lynn and I parted from Port Kaituma aboard a small wooden speedboat on the Kaituma River. Just getting to dockside despite being in a Toyota car is a journey all itself, with all of the bouncing, dipping, side-to-side jerking about traversing what passes for roadways. One would think it impossible to drive in one side and out the other side of moon-crater sized, muddy water and sludge filled pits. That was a modest description of the “good roads”; only military-grade trucks with tires half a story high and suspension slung as high as men dare tackle the “other village streets.”

A few miles out of town, the boat operator had us transfer to another, faster wooden watercraft, which he had ready at his riverbank home and business. As we got under way, the speed was such that the wind made it impossible for many minutes to even open our eyes—until we were able to satisfactorily adjust ourselves to the blast of air that even wrapped around our eyeglasses and pummeled our eyes.

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Nearly two hours later and some 80 or so miles upriver, we were approaching our venue for the afternoon when the bottom fell out of the sky. Fortunately, we had encased our backpacks in big, black garbage bags at the outset to protect them and their contents from potential downpours. We, however, were drenched, even though we attempted to shield ourselves with our ponchos as the boat sped across the waterway.

Yet raining, we approached our midafternoon destination of Kaituma Mouth, a riverside settlement of 465 sprinkled in the rainforest there. Since the tide was out, which dramatically affects even rivers connected to the ocean, several feet of mud, also several feet deep, hindered us from reaching shore conveniently. Brother Kishore “went for a walk,” thigh high in mud to fetch a flat-bottomed skiff to transfer us from the river to the “wharf” via another open boat through which we walked. We walked across the boats to bridge the gap between the river and the shoreline.

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After a primitive break at the edge of the village, we were delighted to find an assembly of approximately 50 souls in the meetinghouse of the Kaituma Mouth Church of Christ. About 11% of the village population came together—a figure much better than usually one finds of church members in ratio to a local populace.

96-dpi-4x6-kaituma-mouth-4Nigel and I each taught a couple of lessons, and Martha taught two lessons. Brethren were thankful for our presence and requested that we return again next year and spend more hours with them, during which we could present even more teaching from God’s Word.

The fifth boat in which we were for the day carried us the remaining 14 miles to Mabaruma. Altogether, we traveled 90 miles or so between Port Kaituma and Mabaruma. We went up one big river and turned left at the next big river. Lacking a suitable infrastructure of highways in Guyana, travelers must resort to small aircraft and watercraft on the numerous waterways.

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Upon our arrival in Mabaruma, we bedded down in the Broome Hotel, where we would spend two nights. The following day, we would begin our next seminar with the Mabaruma Church of Christ. Martha and I both experienced firsts for us on this segment of our trek through the interior of Guyana. She achieved more firsts than did I, and Martha has shown herself to be more than capable and willing to go where we need to go and do what we have to do to serve our Lord in this segment of the vineyard. That “city girl” has gone “country”—or one might even say she’s my “jungle girl.”

Bath Settlement Church of Christ

February 11, 2017


96-dpi-4x6-bath-settlement-6Saturday, February 11, 2017
, the Bath Settlement Church of Christ hosted our next seminar in the late afternoon and the early evening. All five of the churches of Christ in that region participated and were represented at this workshop.

96-dpi-4x6-bath-settlement-2Martha Lynn Rushmore taught ladies’ classes for two hours while brother Nigel Milo and I taught men’s classes for an hour each. In addition, Nigel and I each spoke for an hour to the combined assembly of brothers and sisters. We all enjoyed singing hymns together, we prayed together and we were pleased with general fellowship and refreshments. The three of us presenters and the auditors, too, were all edified and encouraged.

96-dpi-4x6-bath-settlement-11Afterward, brother Milo chauffeured us back the three hours or so to Linden, his home and our base of operations for our annual seminars across all 10 regions of Guyana, South America. What a way—and I can imagine no better way—for Martha and me to spend our honeymoon!