Archive for the ‘Biblical Lesson’ category

Robert’s Bush

March 4, 2017

96-dpi-4x6-roberts-bush-3Friday, March 3 was spent in earnest labors on the next Rushmore Newsletter, the February edition of Gospel Gazette Online (yes, I’m late) and a forthcoming issue of The Voice of Truth International. I finalized the efforts of Rebecca (back in the States), Martha and me on the Rushmore Newsletter, and I sent it digitally to a printing company in Michigan. Subsequently, I sent our newsletter information over the Internet to over 700 persons, some of whom responded almost immediately with congratulations on our marriage, which took place on New Year’s Day this year.

96-dpi-4x6-roberts-bush-1I also prepared and sent the next color postcard to be printed by the same firm. One side of the card shows Martha and me in a flat-bottomed boat, wearing ponchos in a pouring rain, with the tide out and experiencing difficulty getting to shore; the back of the postcard contains information about our mission work.

96-dpi-4x6-roberts-bush-2Saturday, March 4 marked the final 2017 Annual World Evangelism Guyana Nationwide Workshop for this year. It was hosted by the Robert’s Bush Church of Christ. It assembles about an hour from our base in Linden. That was Martha and my 16th seminar this year and over the past six weeks.

96-dpi-4x6-roberts-bush-4Several congregations were represented. Nigel Milo, Martha and I, as at other locations, taught all those present. Brother Milo and I took turns teaching the combined classes as well as classes for the men. Martha taught the ladies classes.

Though this year’s workshops throughout Guyana have just ended, we are already anticipating next year when we will do it all again, Lord willing. Martha has turned out to be a natural, consistently placing the teaching of the Word of God above what is unfamiliar and challenging to her in the surroundings and backdrop of an overseas destination. I think that brethren we encountered have benefitted from the effort of all three of us. However, we are edified and uplifted as much or more than anyone we have visited in Guyana. In any case, to God be the glory!

Lima Sands

February 26, 2017

96-dpi-4x6-lima-sands-4Friday February 24, throughout the day, I worked relentlessly on The Voice of Truth International, volume 92. Though I much prefer working with the alphabet over working with numbers, immersed in proofing and layout all day non-stop, nevertheless, leads to extreme dreariness. It was a relief of sorts that evening when Nigel Milo, Martha and I boarded the Toyota and headed toward our next World Evangelism Nationwide Guyana Workshop. At Georgetown, we took a left to cross the Demerara Harbour Bridge. Guyanese know what rivers are, and the Demerara is a good specimen of a real “river”—one and a quarter miles wide. The bridge spanning the Demerara River is a floating (i.e., anchored on barges) toll bridge with a peaked portion to permit small watercraft to cross beneath it and an additional retractable section to grant passage to larger river traffic (e.g., freighters).

96-dpi-4x6-lima-sands-11On the other side and not far from crossing the river, we proceeded to lodge at a “resort hotel” in preparation for continuation in the early morning (just a few hours later) onward toward Lima Sands, Guyana on the other side of mammoth Essequibo River—20 miles wide at its mouth!

96-dpi-4x6-lima-sands-9Friday night was a restless one for Martha and me as we made use of the modest accommodations (hot water not included). Noisy roomers adjacent our quarters and light leaks over the wall between the two rooms, from the hallway and above the curtains only contributed to our anxiousness as we awaited our 3:30 a.m. alarm to rouse us in anticipation of our 4 a.m. departure.

96-dpi-4x6-lima-sands-7Saturday, Brother Nigel drove the remaining 30 minutes or so to Parika, a river port on the eastern bank of the Essequibo River. By 5:10 a.m., we were aboard a car ferry as pedestrians and on our way for the approximately one hour transit across the big river, weaving through a sprinkling of islands. After disembarking and selecting a taxi, we headed over an hour away to Lima Sands, reachable for the last many minutes with extreme care over a muddy, rutty, gouged and grooved sand road.

96-dpi-4x6-lima-sands-6Doubtless, daily rains hampered travel for all attendees. Eventually, the little church building literally overflowed with Christian brothers and sisters. People were seated on the porch and in the yard, too! Attendance by several congregations swelled the attendance to over 100.

96-dpi-4x6-lima-sands-16Nigel, Martha and I presented lessons; Martha spoke to the ladies for the last hour. The program was punctuated with a lunch and snacks also. Brethren appreciated the program and look forward to repeating it next year, Lord willing, at a sister church in the area.

96-dpi-4x6-lima-sands-14Making a few stops along the way, we retraced our path back to Linden. We arrived, completely exhausted, about 8:30 p.m.

96-dpi-4x6-lima-sands-15Sunday back in Linden, we worshipped once more with the Amelia’s Ward Church of Christ. Again, I taught the morning Bible class in the auditorium, and then, I preached during the evening worship assembly.

96-dpi-4x6-lima-sands-13Saturday we completed 14 of the 16 scheduled programs at the various venues. Two more sites this week will complete the nationwide workshop for 2017. However, there remain some locations on which we are waiting to hear back about even more seminars before Martha and I return to the USA on March 9.

96-dpi-4x6-lima-sands-12There is no better “tired” than being tired for the Lord and in His service. Personally, I’m planning on resting when I’m dead!

Canal #2

February 18, 2017

96-dpi-4x7-canal-two-2Friday evening, February 17, Martha Lynn and I were guests of the Amelia’s Ward Church of Christ “Marriage Class.” Brother Nigel imagined that since between us Martha and I have 90 years of marriage (Martha, 48 years to Bob; Louis, 42 years to Bonnie) that we could offer some useful advice and tips for better marriages. We rambled on a little bit, and perhaps we provided some useful information.

96-dpi-4x7-canal-two-4Saturday, brother Milo drove Martha and me to the meetinghouse of the Claybrick Road Church of Christ in Canal #2. Several brethren from a number of congregations gathered for a morning through midafternoon program—the annual World Evangelism Guyana Workshops. We three delivered about eight lessons in total. Everyone seemed to enjoy the biblical lectures, fellowship and eating together. Both we and they look forward to next year.

96-dpi-4x7-canal-two-3We are holding up fairly well, and we are thoroughly enjoying ourselves as we crisscross the country encouraging and edifying our Christian brethren throughout Guyana. We have a few sessions of our mobile workshop to go yet before we conclude the 16-venue program. Thank you for your interest in our travels and labors for our Lord Jesus Christ.

Lord’s Day in Linden

February 12, 2017
January 2, 2017 with kids & grandkids at Chuck E. Cheese

January 2, 2017 with kids & grandkids at Chuck E. Cheese

Sunday, February 12, 2017, Martha Lynn and I worshipped once more with the Amelia’s Ward Church of Christ in Linden, Guyana, South America. Again today, morning Bible class and worship continued from 8:30 a.m. through almost 12:30 p.m.—four hours! Then, the faithful or diehards returned for evening worship at 6:00 p.m. This morning for Bible class, I taught, “Come Meet Jesus Christ as Pre-Incarnate God”; tonight I preached, “Come Meet Jesus Christ as Messiah and King.” I was able to use PowerPoint presentations both times, though I wondered if I was going to need to resort to “Plan B” since shortly before class time the electric went off, but it came back on in a few minutes. I always have plans “A” through “D” to try to compensate for unintended circumstances.

Additional congregational activities for the upcoming week include visitation in the community three hours or so Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Ladies’ Bible class meets at 5:30 p.m. Monday. Wednesday evening, “Prayer Meeting” is at 5:30 p.m., followed by Bible class at 7:00 p.m. Friday evening at 8:00 p.m., married couples and others interested in marriage meet; this week, Martha and I are to be the principles, and in class discussion we are expected to share advice, counsel and tips that we have learned from the combined 90 years of marriage (48 for Martha married to Bob and 42 for me married to Bonnie). Not to overlook the present, we are expected to speak to the nearly two months that we have been married to each other as well.

This is likely to be a busy, tiring and challenging week since Monday through Saturday we are scheduled to present seminars at five different venues across a wide expanse of Guyana. Tomorrow at 3:30 a.m., we are to leave by car for the Ogle airport for a flight in a little plane to Port Kaituma—the vicinity of the Jonestown Massacre of some decades ago. During late afternoon and early evening, we will speak at one congregational location in Port Kaituma. Tuesday, we are to travel by boat to another area church of Christ. Wednesday, Nigel, Martha and I are to travel three hours or so by boat up two large rivers to Mabaruma; along the way, we will teach in another seminar at a river village. Thursday, we will have a seminar program in Mabaruma. Friday, we fly back to Ogle. Saturday, we cross the Demerara River at Georgetown to present another seminar along a canal.

Though it is not Valentine’s Day just yet, Martha and I exchanged Valentine’s Day Cards today; we agreed that the timing and logistics were better today than hauling the cards with us by car, plane and boat for giving them to each other on February 14. All I can say is, “What a honeymoon!” Whew! We’re not even half way through our 6-week stint yet. We covet the prayers of our brothers and sisters in Christ.

Bath Settlement Church of Christ

February 11, 2017


96-dpi-4x6-bath-settlement-6Saturday, February 11, 2017
, the Bath Settlement Church of Christ hosted our next seminar in the late afternoon and the early evening. All five of the churches of Christ in that region participated and were represented at this workshop.

96-dpi-4x6-bath-settlement-2Martha Lynn Rushmore taught ladies’ classes for two hours while brother Nigel Milo and I taught men’s classes for an hour each. In addition, Nigel and I each spoke for an hour to the combined assembly of brothers and sisters. We all enjoyed singing hymns together, we prayed together and we were pleased with general fellowship and refreshments. The three of us presenters and the auditors, too, were all edified and encouraged.

96-dpi-4x6-bath-settlement-11Afterward, brother Milo chauffeured us back the three hours or so to Linden, his home and our base of operations for our annual seminars across all 10 regions of Guyana, South America. What a way—and I can imagine no better way—for Martha and me to spend our honeymoon!

Camping in Guyana

February 10, 2017

January 24—We arrived at the Cheddi Jagan International Airport near Georgetown, Guyana, South America about 10:30 p.m. Brother Nigel Milo met us and drove us to his home in Linden, which I call Milo’s Bed and Breakfast.

We were met at the door by sister Jasmine Milo, sporting her beautiful smile while welcoming Louis and me. She also had a late supper of eggs and toast. We enjoyed a couple of hours with lots of laughs as we were getting to know one another. They also have a ten-year-old son Zab; he is the sweetest young man. We are now claiming him, too, as one of our grandsons.

January 25—Now to the camping trips we have been taking. First, we flew to the Village of Paramakatoi, all seven of us—including the pilot. The small plane had holes for air in the windows, but they also let in water from the rain clouds through which we flew. What a new experience for me! Many of the villagers, cows, donkeys, horses and dogs (the scrawniest I have ever seen) came out to greet us. The people in this area are Amerindian.

The first place we saw was the local one-room “Wal-Mart,” post office and airport. One entrepreneur named Sam runs this business. He was very kind to us. We told him we had just gotten married, and he gave us a wedding gift of two pineapple fruit juices.

The Amerindians have very few amenities. We have more in the States when we go camping. At least when we go camping in the US, we have flushing toilets! Instead, we had outhouses. There certainly were no dishwashers either. We took our showers, pouring water on us from a bowl dipped from a bucket; then, we lathered up with soap and rinsed off in cold water—unless we heated it on the stove. Yes, we stayed in a nice corner room with windows on both sides; this was the AC. We also had a mesh mosquito net to use at night to keep from being bait for the insects, especially the mosquitos. They seem to love Louis and me. We must be very sweet! Louis is so glad to share me for their breakfast, lunch, supper and snacks. Isn’t he so nice?

The village guesthouse had toilets, but they did not work because the piping needed to be fixed. So, to the outhouse we went. This was not bad except at night. I did not like going out at night because I was somewhat worried about the slithering reptiles.

96-dpi-4x6-paramakatoi-2On our way to the church building, we had to walk in pouring down rain. We were soaked, even though wearing our rain ponchos—my yellow, Pittsburgh Steelers rain gear prompting Louis to say that I looked like a duck. We spent Wednesday night singing and listening to Louis and brother Nigel Milo who each gave one talk on Jesus Our Example.” The brethren were very welcoming to us. The singing was really beautiful, and we sang old songs with which I grew up. This brought back a lot of childhood memories.

96-dpi-4x6-paramakatoi-12January 26-27—On Thursday and Friday mornings, all three of us taught lessons. I had the ladies, and I really enjoyed them. I had some children, and I did a short Bible story for them to make them seem special and part of the class. I could not leave them out. With the children, I did the “Days of Creation,” and for the ladies, we did the Book of Ruth. The ladies sang the chorus of two songs for me in their native, tribal language. I pray our efforts at Paramakatoi were prosperous for the Lord.

After Friday’s session, we flew from Paramakatoi to Mahdia airport, and then we got on board another plane to fly back to Ogle. From Ogle, brother Nigel was our chauffeur back to Linden—to the Milo B & B. Louis says, “We fly low with Milo.”

January 29—On Sunday, we worshipped with the brethren of the Amelia Ward Church of Christ, where brother Milo is the preacher. Louis taught Bible class, and the preacher from the Coomacka congregation did the lesson. The brethren from this congregation came for worship. Louis spoke Sunday evening.

January 30—On Monday morning, Nigel, Louis and I, along with some of the ladies from church, went out to do some door knocking and Bible studies that were set up. We split up in threes. We worked until about 12:00.

That same evening, I had the pleasure of teaching the ladies’ class for the Amelia’s Ward congregation. We had a very good class, and I had a lot of participation. We also studied the Book of Ruth, and then I asked them some Bible trivia questions. I felt so rewarded.

I cannot believe that while teaching I did not realize how hot it was in the building. I was told by one of my coworkers that I would not realize how hot it was while teaching. She was right. I cannot believe how fast the nervous jitters went away as I started teaching. This has been a great lesson for me.

My prayer and my goal is always to glorify God. My second goal is to edify those around me.

My Martha

January 30, 2017

96-dpi-4x6-amelias-ward-4Today (Monday, January 30, 2017), my Martha and I tagged along this morning with seven other church members from the Amelia’s Ward Church of Christ to visit Christians and non-Christians in the community. We divided up into three groups for studies as well as to visit ill members and non-members. The congregation goes into its municipality three times weekly—Monday, Wednesday and Friday—for about four hours each day. Even if brother Nigel Milo, the church’s evangelist, is unavailable—as he will be Wednesday as he and we attend to the nationwide seminars—Christian workers have the initiative and the training to go into the fields that truly are white unto harvest on their own. This church of Christ is exemplary in so many ways, including taking the Gospel to distant in-country locations at members’ expenses and teaching brethren from afar how to setup and conduct Bible studies and distribute literature in their own neighborhoods. In these matters, I am the student rather than the teacher.
96-dpi-4x6-amelias-ward-5After concluding the field work for the day, brother Milo carted Martha and me to the local market and surrounding businesses in search of a few commodities that we sought for ourselves and our treks in Guyana this year. I was pleased to find two pair of “cargo pants” that fit me—except for being a mile too long for my short legs. Befuddled I was when directed to try them on in the public market—sans fitting room! I found a corner that promised minimal privacy and to my amazement the only size available fit me perfectly—not counting the length of the pant legs. However, a seamstress on site immediately rectified the problem and hemmed my new trousers. (It became apparent that I could not cram satisfactorily into my regular khaki or jean pockets enough items beyond what I could carry in my backpack to be weighed—along with my carryon—in preparation for passage in small planes navigating the jungle interior on the way to distant, remote villages. Cargo pants to the rescue!)

96-dpi-4x6-amelias-ward-3Martha and I each bought a pair of plastic or rubber sandals, too. I was replacing a pair that I had bought the prior year at the same shop because the soles of last year’s purchase were split and winding down their usefulness; I wore them across the globe. While in the bazaar—resembling a small flee market in the USA—Martha took up with a couple of strangers and proceeded to tell them that she and I were recently married on New Year’s Day 2017. The ladies in the market were treated to a full disclosure of our wedding pictures right there under the awnings spanning little shops in the narrow pathway snaking through the marketplace! After a couple more purchases (corded eyeglasses retainer, bottled water, coca cola and fried chicken from Church’s Chicken), we retreated to the Milo residence.

96-dpi-4x6-amelias-ward-6Our late lunch concluded, Martha cleaned up from the oppressive heat of the day, rested some and rehearsed her lesson for teaching ladies’ class later in the evening—from around 5:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. On the other hand, I refrained from refreshing myself, refusing to soil additional clothes unnecessarily on the same day; perspiration dried and not too aromatically challenging to others around me or to myself, I persisted until end of day before bathing at bedtime.

Martha has turned out to be a real trooper! She is enjoying every aspect of our escapades in Guyana whereby we immerse ourselves in this lovely country and culture as we serve the Lord—encouraging and edifying brothers and sisters primarily and non-Christians, also. Mostly packed, we are anticipating an early morning departure to meet our flight from Ogle to Lethem by yet another small aircraft spiriting us over the jungles and to the border with Brazil. We will remain there for several days as we promote the seminar in yet another isolated village in which brethren joyfully greet us and assemble to feast on God’s Word.