Camping in the Mountains of Guyana, South America

Always before when our team went to Paramakatoi, we were able to lodge in the Amerindian guesthouse there, and over the years, its amenities have been upgraded. This time, however, government officials, who had come for the dedication of a water system, trumped our plan to reside in the guesthouse once more. Consequently, we camped in the classroom of the church building. Martha and I occupied one tent, while brother Nigel Milo slept in a pup tent. Brother Frederick Darrel slumbered nightly in a hammock. On the plus side, we didn’t have to walk to the meetinghouse—since we were already in it! The downside, though, was bucket and cup bathing in the shed for the ATV and using an outhouse.

We flew into Paramakatoi on a small twin-prop plane, and after five days flew out on a larger single-prop airplane. The flight to Paramakatoi in the mountains from Ogle on the coast was direct, but the return trip made stops at Monkey Mountain (a gravel airstrip) and Mahdia.

Martha and I were certainly out of our comfort zone, and our arthritis distinctly worked against us. I also battle low blood pressure.

The mountain village of Paramakatoi is the only place to which we go in Guyana where we get cold. Sweat clothes for sleeping at night and jackets at least in the morning are a must. We even bought a couple of blankets while there—extremely thin but unexpectedly almost too warm.

All four of us taught while visiting the Paramakatoi Church of Christ. Frederick Darrel, Nigel Milo and I took turns day and night, and Martha taught a couple hundred children and their teachers who graced us with their presence one morning.

A few excitements occurred during our time in Paramakatoi. Guyana’s First Lady officially commissioned a new solar-powered water system. Since it is nearly election time, her husband’s political party and the opposing political party were well represented in the crowded soccer field. Venders sold their wares and the music loudly blasted the village until 2 a.m. daily. The whole affair resembled a small county fair. There were more aircraft coming and going in one day than would usually arrive and depart over several months.

Near the conclusion of our time in Paramakatoi, we presented to attendees new Bibles. On our way out of Paramakatoi, we were able to give a preacher and his wife a ride to Monkey Mountain—saving them an 8-hour hike up and down serious hills; the plane was already going that way, so we quickly added them to our passenger manifest.

We believe that we edified brethren from the two congregations which assembled for our workshop. In addition, we encouraged them and commended them as well for their continued evangelistic outreach into distant villages. This little church, which hosted our program, in the edge and on the fringe of an otherwise busy world is self-supporting. Through their own initiative and ambition the congregation launched out with the Gospel comparable to the commendable achievements with the Gospel of the church at Thessalonica (1 Thessalonians 1:8). This little family of God meets three days a week for worship and devotionals to praise God and fortify itself.

Martha and I fawn over the little ones. Little girls especially are drawn to Martha, and I enjoy playing with the children, too.

It was a hard outing for us, and we exhausted all the clothes we brought to Guyana. We were delighted to shower and rest in a bed once more. I hadn’t shaved for a week!

Explore posts in the same categories: Bibles, Guyana, Lessons by Martha, Mission Trip, Overseas, Travel

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