Canal #2

Posted February 18, 2017 by Louis Rushmore
Categories: Biblical Lesson, Guyana, Mission Trip, Overseas, Travel

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96-dpi-4x7-canal-two-2Friday evening, February 17, Martha Lynn and I were guests of the Amelia’s Ward Church of Christ “Marriage Class.” Brother Nigel imagined that since between us Martha and I have 90 years of marriage (Martha, 48 years to Bob; Louis, 42 years to Bonnie) that we could offer some useful advice and tips for better marriages. We rambled on a little bit, and perhaps we provided some useful information.

96-dpi-4x7-canal-two-4Saturday, brother Milo drove Martha and me to the meetinghouse of the Claybrick Road Church of Christ in Canal #2. Several brethren from a number of congregations gathered for a morning through midafternoon program—the annual World Evangelism Guyana Workshops. We three delivered about eight lessons in total. Everyone seemed to enjoy the biblical lectures, fellowship and eating together. Both we and they look forward to next year.

96-dpi-4x7-canal-two-3We are holding up fairly well, and we are thoroughly enjoying ourselves as we crisscross the country encouraging and edifying our Christian brethren throughout Guyana. We have a few sessions of our mobile workshop to go yet before we conclude the 16-venue program. Thank you for your interest in our travels and labors for our Lord Jesus Christ.

Mabaruma Church of Christ

Posted February 17, 2017 by Louis Rushmore
Categories: Guyana, Lessons by Martha, Mission Trip, Overseas, Travel

96-dpi-4x6-mabaruma-2Thursday, February 16, we conducted our World Evangelism Guyana Workshop on Mabaruma Hill with the Mabaruma Church of Christ. The program ran from about 9:30 a.m. through 2:30 p.m., and then, we returned to the church house for a special program with the youth from 4:30 p.m. through 6:30 p.m. Throughout the day and evening sessions, Nigel and I taught combined classes of men and women, while during split periods, brother Milo and I took turns teaching the men and Martha taught the ladies. Brethren from several area congregations were present. Friday, we will return by air to Ogle from where we began this segment of our foray into Guyana several days ago.

96-dpi-4x6-mabaruma-3A few workshop venues remain, but the most challenging trips are now concluded. Overnight trips are now complete. At least one more quest will be challenging when we cross to the far side of the Essequibo River, but that is still a day trip. May any good we have accomplished and whatever edification we may have provided for our Christian brethren be all to the glory of God.

Kaituma Mouth

Posted February 17, 2017 by Louis Rushmore
Categories: Guyana, Ladies' Class, Lessons by Martha, Mission Trip, Overseas, Preaching Appointments, Seminar, Travel

Still in Region 1, Wednesday, February 15, Nigel Milo, Kishore Etwaroo, Martha Lynn and I parted from Port Kaituma aboard a small wooden speedboat on the Kaituma River. Just getting to dockside despite being in a Toyota car is a journey all itself, with all of the bouncing, dipping, side-to-side jerking about traversing what passes for roadways. One would think it impossible to drive in one side and out the other side of moon-crater sized, muddy water and sludge filled pits. That was a modest description of the “good roads”; only military-grade trucks with tires half a story high and suspension slung as high as men dare tackle the “other village streets.”

A few miles out of town, the boat operator had us transfer to another, faster wooden watercraft, which he had ready at his riverbank home and business. As we got under way, the speed was such that the wind made it impossible for many minutes to even open our eyes—until we were able to satisfactorily adjust ourselves to the blast of air that even wrapped around our eyeglasses and pummeled our eyes.

96-dpi-4x6-kaituma-mouth-2
Nearly two hours later and some 80 or so miles upriver, we were approaching our venue for the afternoon when the bottom fell out of the sky. Fortunately, we had encased our backpacks in big, black garbage bags at the outset to protect them and their contents from potential downpours. We, however, were drenched, even though we attempted to shield ourselves with our ponchos as the boat sped across the waterway.

Yet raining, we approached our midafternoon destination of Kaituma Mouth, a riverside settlement of 465 sprinkled in the rainforest there. Since the tide was out, which dramatically affects even rivers connected to the ocean, several feet of mud, also several feet deep, hindered us from reaching shore conveniently. Brother Kishore “went for a walk,” thigh high in mud to fetch a flat-bottomed skiff to transfer us from the river to the “wharf” via another open boat through which we walked. We walked across the boats to bridge the gap between the river and the shoreline.

96-dpi-4x6-kaituma-mouth-3
After a primitive break at the edge of the village, we were delighted to find an assembly of approximately 50 souls in the meetinghouse of the Kaituma Mouth Church of Christ. About 11% of the village population came together—a figure much better than usually one finds of church members in ratio to a local populace.

96-dpi-4x6-kaituma-mouth-4Nigel and I each taught a couple of lessons, and Martha taught two lessons. Brethren were thankful for our presence and requested that we return again next year and spend more hours with them, during which we could present even more teaching from God’s Word.

The fifth boat in which we were for the day carried us the remaining 14 miles to Mabaruma. Altogether, we traveled 90 miles or so between Port Kaituma and Mabaruma. We went up one big river and turned left at the next big river. Lacking a suitable infrastructure of highways in Guyana, travelers must resort to small aircraft and watercraft on the numerous waterways.

96-dpi-4x6-kaituma-mouth-1
Upon our arrival in Mabaruma, we bedded down in the Broome Hotel, where we would spend two nights. The following day, we would begin our next seminar with the Mabaruma Church of Christ. Martha and I both experienced firsts for us on this segment of our trek through the interior of Guyana. She achieved more firsts than did I, and Martha has shown herself to be more than capable and willing to go where we need to go and do what we have to do to serve our Lord in this segment of the vineyard. That “city girl” has gone “country”—or one might even say she’s my “jungle girl.”

Region 1

Posted February 17, 2017 by Louis Rushmore
Categories: Guyana, Lessons by Martha, Mission Trip, Preaching Appointments, Seminar, Travel

96-dpi-5x7-estate-12Monday, February 13 came early at 2:30 a.m. in Linden, Guyana, South America for Martha Lynn and me. We hadn’t been in bed probably more than two and a half hours. To say we were less than rested would be a huge understatement.

96-dpi-5x7-estate-13Ambling down the outside stairs from the Milo living quarters, brother Nigel and we, along with a backpack apiece, settled into his Toyota car for the hour and a half ride to the Ogle airport. However, as it turned out, we arrived about an hour ahead of time to check in, and so we slept in the car to a little past check-in time. Checked in, we deposited ourselves in the “departure lounge,” awaiting our flight in a Cessna Caravan to Port Kaituma. It was at that town’s airstrip and outside of the village that several years ago the Jonestown episode unfolded with the suicide-murder of several hundred misguided religionists.

96-dpi-5x7-estate-1All three of us snoozed on the 50-minute flight from Ogle to Port Kaituma as the aircraft first climbed into the sky over the Atlantic Ocean before traveling northward along the Guyanese coastline. Then, it turned inland and flew over jungles and forested hills.

96-dpi-5x7-estate-9Nothing I could say to forewarn Martha could prepare her for what we found upon our arrival. Upon departing from the “airport,” after we registered with the local officials, a local taxied us to our lodging through muddy, boggy craters that passed for the arteries through the community of Port Kaituma. There may be worse roads on planet earth somewhere, but I haven’t found them as yet—and I don’t want to experience such!

96-dpi-5x7-estate-8As it was last year when I came to Guyana alone, this year we took a room at a small and humble establishment dubbed “The Ranch.” The motto on the sign there says, “Stay & Play.” Certainly, the accommodations and amenities were adequate for our purposes, but don’t anyone be misled by the company motto to imagine that we bedded down in some lush resort. The electric to the community was off, and so there were neither lights to mitigate the darkness were we to shut the door (blacked out window) as we fumbled our way to the toilet nor fan to dull the warmth of the day or stir the air. When the electric did come on is when we found that of the three light sockets in the room, only one had a working bulb in it. We literally borrowed a light bulb from the home of our host Kishore Etwaroo, and we procured a second pillow and a second towel.

96-dpi-5x7-estate-3Late afternoon and early evening we three along with other brethren assembled at the Estate Church of Christ in Port Kaituma. Martha taught the ladies for two hours, and brother Nigel and I each taught the men an hour apiece. I was so tired that while brother Milo was speaking, I nearly fell off of my plank bench to crash into the seat ahead of me on my way to the rough, concrete floor.

96-dpi-5x7-estate-14Tuesday morning, after breakfast at the Etwaroo home (we enjoyed their hospitable meals the two days in Port Kaituma), we took a taxi to the port to board the “church bus”—a large boat, since the day’s destination is only accessible from the river. From 9:00 a.m. through 4:00 p.m., we three travelers taught classes in the meetinghouse and on the grounds of the Turu Mission Church of Christ. Several congregations were represented, each bringing boatloads of brothers and sisters in Christ from as far away as 22 miles. Attendance was in the neighborhood of 75. It was a full day of fellowship and edification via prayers, singing and biblical lessons. Brethren made a point of thanking us for it all, as well as for The Voice of Truth International and additional literature made available to all of the churches of Christ in Guyana from our World Evangelism base in Winona, Mississippi. Nearly 2,000 pounds of literature awaits my return to the States to haul to a shipping agent in Nashville, Tennessee.

96-dpi-5x7-estate-10Nigel, Martha and I have a sense of gratification for how these two days in Port Kaituma progressed. We made a concerted effort therein and thereby to glorify God and edify our fellow man. Praise God and may His name only be blessed. Brethren, please continue to pray for us in harness for our Lord Jesus Christ. Tomorrow, we travel by boats up two large rivers as we snake our way through the jungle to our next venue, pausing for a 2-hour seminar along the way. Wednesday night we expect to lodge in Mabaruma, Guyana.

Lord’s Day in Linden

Posted February 12, 2017 by Louis Rushmore
Categories: Biblical Lesson, Guyana, Mission Trip, Overseas, Seminar, Travel

January 2, 2017 with kids & grandkids at Chuck E. Cheese

January 2, 2017 with kids & grandkids at Chuck E. Cheese

Sunday, February 12, 2017, Martha Lynn and I worshipped once more with the Amelia’s Ward Church of Christ in Linden, Guyana, South America. Again today, morning Bible class and worship continued from 8:30 a.m. through almost 12:30 p.m.—four hours! Then, the faithful or diehards returned for evening worship at 6:00 p.m. This morning for Bible class, I taught, “Come Meet Jesus Christ as Pre-Incarnate God”; tonight I preached, “Come Meet Jesus Christ as Messiah and King.” I was able to use PowerPoint presentations both times, though I wondered if I was going to need to resort to “Plan B” since shortly before class time the electric went off, but it came back on in a few minutes. I always have plans “A” through “D” to try to compensate for unintended circumstances.

Additional congregational activities for the upcoming week include visitation in the community three hours or so Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Ladies’ Bible class meets at 5:30 p.m. Monday. Wednesday evening, “Prayer Meeting” is at 5:30 p.m., followed by Bible class at 7:00 p.m. Friday evening at 8:00 p.m., married couples and others interested in marriage meet; this week, Martha and I are to be the principles, and in class discussion we are expected to share advice, counsel and tips that we have learned from the combined 90 years of marriage (48 for Martha married to Bob and 42 for me married to Bonnie). Not to overlook the present, we are expected to speak to the nearly two months that we have been married to each other as well.

This is likely to be a busy, tiring and challenging week since Monday through Saturday we are scheduled to present seminars at five different venues across a wide expanse of Guyana. Tomorrow at 3:30 a.m., we are to leave by car for the Ogle airport for a flight in a little plane to Port Kaituma—the vicinity of the Jonestown Massacre of some decades ago. During late afternoon and early evening, we will speak at one congregational location in Port Kaituma. Tuesday, we are to travel by boat to another area church of Christ. Wednesday, Nigel, Martha and I are to travel three hours or so by boat up two large rivers to Mabaruma; along the way, we will teach in another seminar at a river village. Thursday, we will have a seminar program in Mabaruma. Friday, we fly back to Ogle. Saturday, we cross the Demerara River at Georgetown to present another seminar along a canal.

Though it is not Valentine’s Day just yet, Martha and I exchanged Valentine’s Day Cards today; we agreed that the timing and logistics were better today than hauling the cards with us by car, plane and boat for giving them to each other on February 14. All I can say is, “What a honeymoon!” Whew! We’re not even half way through our 6-week stint yet. We covet the prayers of our brothers and sisters in Christ.

Bath Settlement Church of Christ

Posted February 11, 2017 by Louis Rushmore
Categories: Biblical Lesson, Guyana, Ladies' Class, Lessons by Martha, Mission Trip, Overseas, Travel

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96-dpi-4x6-bath-settlement-6Saturday, February 11, 2017
, the Bath Settlement Church of Christ hosted our next seminar in the late afternoon and the early evening. All five of the churches of Christ in that region participated and were represented at this workshop.

96-dpi-4x6-bath-settlement-2Martha Lynn Rushmore taught ladies’ classes for two hours while brother Nigel Milo and I taught men’s classes for an hour each. In addition, Nigel and I each spoke for an hour to the combined assembly of brothers and sisters. We all enjoyed singing hymns together, we prayed together and we were pleased with general fellowship and refreshments. The three of us presenters and the auditors, too, were all edified and encouraged.

96-dpi-4x6-bath-settlement-11Afterward, brother Milo chauffeured us back the three hours or so to Linden, his home and our base of operations for our annual seminars across all 10 regions of Guyana, South America. What a way—and I can imagine no better way—for Martha and me to spend our honeymoon!

Camping in Guyana

Posted February 10, 2017 by Martha Rushmore
Categories: Biblical Lesson, Children, Children's Class, Guyana, Ladies' Class, Lessons by Martha, Mission Trip, Overseas, Travel

January 24—We arrived at the Cheddi Jagan International Airport near Georgetown, Guyana, South America about 10:30 p.m. Brother Nigel Milo met us and drove us to his home in Linden, which I call Milo’s Bed and Breakfast.

We were met at the door by sister Jasmine Milo, sporting her beautiful smile while welcoming Louis and me. She also had a late supper of eggs and toast. We enjoyed a couple of hours with lots of laughs as we were getting to know one another. They also have a ten-year-old son Zab; he is the sweetest young man. We are now claiming him, too, as one of our grandsons.

January 25—Now to the camping trips we have been taking. First, we flew to the Village of Paramakatoi, all seven of us—including the pilot. The small plane had holes for air in the windows, but they also let in water from the rain clouds through which we flew. What a new experience for me! Many of the villagers, cows, donkeys, horses and dogs (the scrawniest I have ever seen) came out to greet us. The people in this area are Amerindian.

The first place we saw was the local one-room “Wal-Mart,” post office and airport. One entrepreneur named Sam runs this business. He was very kind to us. We told him we had just gotten married, and he gave us a wedding gift of two pineapple fruit juices.

The Amerindians have very few amenities. We have more in the States when we go camping. At least when we go camping in the US, we have flushing toilets! Instead, we had outhouses. There certainly were no dishwashers either. We took our showers, pouring water on us from a bowl dipped from a bucket; then, we lathered up with soap and rinsed off in cold water—unless we heated it on the stove. Yes, we stayed in a nice corner room with windows on both sides; this was the AC. We also had a mesh mosquito net to use at night to keep from being bait for the insects, especially the mosquitos. They seem to love Louis and me. We must be very sweet! Louis is so glad to share me for their breakfast, lunch, supper and snacks. Isn’t he so nice?

The village guesthouse had toilets, but they did not work because the piping needed to be fixed. So, to the outhouse we went. This was not bad except at night. I did not like going out at night because I was somewhat worried about the slithering reptiles.

96-dpi-4x6-paramakatoi-2On our way to the church building, we had to walk in pouring down rain. We were soaked, even though wearing our rain ponchos—my yellow, Pittsburgh Steelers rain gear prompting Louis to say that I looked like a duck. We spent Wednesday night singing and listening to Louis and brother Nigel Milo who each gave one talk on Jesus Our Example.” The brethren were very welcoming to us. The singing was really beautiful, and we sang old songs with which I grew up. This brought back a lot of childhood memories.

96-dpi-4x6-paramakatoi-12January 26-27—On Thursday and Friday mornings, all three of us taught lessons. I had the ladies, and I really enjoyed them. I had some children, and I did a short Bible story for them to make them seem special and part of the class. I could not leave them out. With the children, I did the “Days of Creation,” and for the ladies, we did the Book of Ruth. The ladies sang the chorus of two songs for me in their native, tribal language. I pray our efforts at Paramakatoi were prosperous for the Lord.

After Friday’s session, we flew from Paramakatoi to Mahdia airport, and then we got on board another plane to fly back to Ogle. From Ogle, brother Nigel was our chauffeur back to Linden—to the Milo B & B. Louis says, “We fly low with Milo.”

January 29—On Sunday, we worshipped with the brethren of the Amelia Ward Church of Christ, where brother Milo is the preacher. Louis taught Bible class, and the preacher from the Coomacka congregation did the lesson. The brethren from this congregation came for worship. Louis spoke Sunday evening.

January 30—On Monday morning, Nigel, Louis and I, along with some of the ladies from church, went out to do some door knocking and Bible studies that were set up. We split up in threes. We worked until about 12:00.

That same evening, I had the pleasure of teaching the ladies’ class for the Amelia’s Ward congregation. We had a very good class, and I had a lot of participation. We also studied the Book of Ruth, and then I asked them some Bible trivia questions. I felt so rewarded.

I cannot believe that while teaching I did not realize how hot it was in the building. I was told by one of my coworkers that I would not realize how hot it was while teaching. She was right. I cannot believe how fast the nervous jitters went away as I started teaching. This has been a great lesson for me.

My prayer and my goal is always to glorify God. My second goal is to edify those around me.